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The Norman Conquest in Numbers by James Aitcheson

Posted on: 14/10/2016 with tags: author blog, English History, historical crime, historical fiction, Medieval, medieval england, medieval history, The Norman Conquest, Asian History, Medieval, Norman

This month marks the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings: the beginning of the Norman Conquest of England, and perhaps the single most famous event in all of British history. The battle, which took place on 14 October 1066, saw King Harold II killed and his English army defeated by Duke William of Normandy, who shortly afterwards was himself crowned king, ushering in a new French-speaking ruling dynasty and altering England’s destiny forever. 7,000 Estimated size both of Harold’s army an…

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Reading to accompany Eden Gardens

Posted on: 21/04/2016 with tags: colonialism, eden gardens, India, louise brown, Asian History

Louise Brown collates some additional reading and the books she used in her research of Eden Gardens. Many of the books that have contributed to the making of Eden Gardens are out of print. The following is a small selection of things I’ve found useful, and that are still widely available either because they are in print, or can be found in libraries and second hand book shops. Novels and short stories Bardhan, Kalpana, (ed.) Of Women, Outcastes, Peasants, and Rebels: A Selection of Bengali Shor…

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Poor whites – Loafers, Vagrants and ‘Low Europeans’

Posted on: 20/04/2016 with tags: british raj, colonialism, eden gardens, indian rebellion, louise brown, Asian History

Louise Brown, author of Eden Gardens, explains more about the invisibility of poor whites in the British Raj. Poor whites do not figure prominently in the histories of the British Raj. ‘Low Europeans’, as they were called at the time, can be found in the writings of Rudyard Kipling, but, today, most people’s image of the British in colonial India is formed by the social world of the sahibs and memsahibs, usually the middle class servants of Empire who aped the manners of the Victorian and Edward…

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Inspired by The Killing Fields

Posted on: 29/01/2016 with tags: Cambodia, Jacob's Colours, Lindsay Hawdon, The Killing Fields, 20th Century, Asian History, World History

Lindsay Hawdon has written this brilliant and moving article for us about her trip to Cambodia which helped inspire her novel Jakob’s Colours: ‘In October 2011 I set off with my two young boys on a trip around South East Asia for a year.  Though Jakob’s Colours is set during WWII, the following story very much affected a large part of the writing.  The events that occurred in Cambodia, only thirty six years ago, are very similar to what occurred during the holocaust.  Tragically they are still o…

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