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Using Real Historical Characters in Fiction – S.G MacLean

Posted on: 14/11/2016 with tags: British History, civil war, cromwell, Damien Seeker, english civil war, English History, historical fiction, historical novel, history, oliver cromwell, S.G MacLean, The Black Friar, The Commonwealth, The Seeker

I am often asked about the extent to which I use real historical characters in my fiction. Because I write historical crime, I don’t feel I can use real characters as the victims or perpetrators of crimes that never actually happened, so I tend to just have them as subsidiary characters, and will occasionally throw suspicion on them. However, my most firm rule is not to show real historical characters in a bad light unless the portrayal is supported by historical record. I always bear in mind th…

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A guest blog from author Julian Stockwin

Posted on: 03/04/2014 with tags: Britain, British History, eBooks, historical fiction, history, Julian Stockwin, Napoleon, Napoleonic wars, seafaring, Thomas Kydd

I’m really delighted that Hodder is launching the first of four special 3-ebook bundles of the Kydd series today. Looking back over the past thirteen years that I have been writing these books one of the aspects that gives me special pleasure is the bond that has developed between my two main characters, Thomas Kydd and Nicholas Renzi. Kydd is a young wigmaker having a quiet ale with his friends in the local pub in Guildford when his life is about to change forever. He is taken by the pres…

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What if Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon had produced a surviving male heir?

Posted on: 21/11/2013 with tags: alternate history, anne boleyn, Art Under Attack, author blog, British History, Catholicism, debut novel, dissolution of the monasteries, henry viii, historical fiction, Iconoclasm, katherine of aragon, Margery Polley, Martin Luther, Mary Tudor, medieval england, plague land, Protestantism, puritans, Reformation, religion, religious history, rewrite history, s d sykes, Tate Britain, the tudors

by historical novelist S. D. Sykes A fragment of smashed glass. The defaced image of the Virgin. A decapitated effigy of the Christ child. All glimpses into an alternate history – the history of England, had a son of Catherine of Aragon survived to become King. Last week I visited the ‘Art under Attack’ exhibition currently at the Tate Britain – a look into the history of British iconoclasm. The part of the show which interested me most concerned the attacks on the art of the church – by the chu…

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