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An exclusive extract from By Blood Divided by James Heneage

Posted on: 01/06/2017 with tags: author blog, extract, historical fiction, historical novel, James Heneage, Medieval, medieval history, European, Medieval, Middle Ages

By Blood Divided is the new standalone novel from James Heneage, which has been collecting praise form fellow historical fiction writers at the rate Henry VIII collected wives (basically it’s getting lots). To celebrate it’s publication day, we’re treating you to this exclusive extract – enjoy! ‘A dramatic read from the very outset’ Simon Scarrow ‘A fast-moving and superbly intelligent adventure’ Jason Goodwin ‘A stirring tale of the struggle for Byzantium, Heneage brings to life both the traged…

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Waiting for D-Day – Marianne Kavanagh on the week before Operation Neptune

Posted on: 18/05/2017 with tags: English History, historical fiction, world war II, WW2

Six days form the structure of SHOULD YOU ASK ME – six days in May 1944 just before D-Day. This is how long it takes 86-year-old Mary to tell her story to William, a young policeman recently invalided out of the army, and for William in turn to confess. With wartime resources stretched to the limit, Mary’s tale of two long-dead bodies is not considered high priority. Only William has the time to listen. Meanwhile, both inside and outside the small rural police station in Dorset, it feels as if v…

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Spy Fever: how spy lies led to the creation of the Secret Service

Posted on: 17/05/2017 with tags: author blog, conspiracy theories, crime fiction, English History, historical crime, historical fiction, 20th Century

For a historical novelist, the usual way of things is to delve into history, to look at what’s interesting or important, a setting, an event, a time period – we write into this, try to recreate, re-imagine, re-use as we see fit. But what happens when this gets turned on its head, when fiction starts turning into fact? In writing my first historical novel – The Irregular, set in 1909 – I discovered a startling example of invention becoming real, of fiction (spy fiction no less) having a very prof…

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Take to the air with Claude Grahame-White and Rebecca Mascull

Posted on: 03/05/2017 with tags: historical fiction, Rebecca Mascull, The Wild Air, 20th Century, WW1

Author of The Wild Air Rebecca Mascull explores women’s position in the aviation industry and the real-life figure of Claude Grahame-White. A major personality of early aviation, Claude Grahame-White is rightly revered for his place in the history of flying. So, this is what’s true and what isn’t about Claude Grahame-White in my book The Wild Air: he was very good-looking – just look at any photograph! And he was married to a wealthy socialite. He was instrumental in the creation and development…

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