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History in the Court, Goldsboro Books 26th September 2013

Posted on: 18/09/2013 with tags: Anthony Riches, authors, event, Goldsboro Books, historical fiction, history, History in the Court, robyn young

Next week sees the return of History in the Court at the fabulous independent bookshop Goldsboro Books in the heart of London. Held in conjunction with the Historical Writers’ Association, History in the Court is an evening dedicated to celebrating the very best of historical writing.  If you’ve never been before, don’t miss this wonderful opportunity to meet some of your favourite historical writers (our very own Robyn Young and Anthony Riches will be there), buy some first ed…

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Of Biscuits and Banquets (and the Great British Bake Off)

Posted on: 17/09/2013 with tags: An Appetite for Violets, baking, banquet, Bergamot, biscuits, Earl Grey tea, Elizabeth I, food, historical fiction, historical recipes, Martine Bailey, recipes, Spice, Sugar, Sugarwork, The Great British Bake Off

Tonight it is Biscuit Week on The Great British Bake Off, with a technical challenge to bake the thinnest tuiles and create a ‘Biscuit Tower’. We usually associate the Georgian past with roast beef and steaming puddings, but in fact their biscuits were extraordinarily delicate. Macaroons, lemon wafers and ginger nuts were popular, though generally eaten with wine rather than tea. Bergamot was a high fashion flavouring, extracted from the skin of bergamot oranges. Nowadays, its spicy orange scent…

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Rebecca Mascull, author of THE VISITORS, on the inspiration behind her debut novel

Posted on: 11/09/2013 with tags: farming, historical fiction, hop farmers, hops, Kent, oast houses, Rebecca Mascull, research, The Visitors

In my novel THE VISITORS, the main character’s father is a Victorian hop farmer. He owns hop fields in Kent, where his men place hop poles in the ground, then walking on stilts they string up the coir twine between each pole. Beautiful rows of bright green hop bines. You can clearly see how the hops grow up the wires which were strung up by the farm workers, often walking on stilts. The men train the hop plants to grow clockwise around the strings and spray them with soft soap to kill pests. In…

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