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How Did Henry VIII become a monster? by Alison Weir

Posted on: 23/01/2017 with tags: alison weir, anne boleyn, author blog, henry viii, historical fiction, historical novel, katherine of aragon, Six Tudor Queens, six wives, tudors, Tudor

Alison Weir, author of KATHERINE OF ARAGON: THE TRUE QUEEN, the first in her Six Tudor Queens series looks at a common misconception about Henry VIII…   I would like to correct a misconception about Henry VIII. It is often claimed that he suddenly changed character, for the worse, in 1536, after a blow to the head sustained in a fall. On 24 January that year, during a joust at Greenwich, he was indeed thrown from his horse. Rodolfo Pio, the Papal Nuncio in Paris, reported on 12 February t…

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Jack Lark’s Christmas – Paul Fraser Collard

Posted on: 28/11/2016 with tags: author blog, christmas, historical fiction, Paul Fraser Collard, Redcoat, Victorian, Victorian

Jack Lark’s Christmas Paul Fraser Collard explores Christmas for a Victorian redcoat soldier Jack Lark awoke with a groan. Reveille was sounding, the bugler giving it a louder and longer flourish than usual. But it was not a day to linger under the blanket even though, like on a Sunday, he could have rested there for another hour. Already the chill barrack room was noisy, his messmates up and exchanging loud greetings, for once without their usual swearing and abuse. ‘Come on, Mud.’ Pike, the so…

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Author David Morrell on escaping to Victorian London

Posted on: 17/11/2016 with tags: author blog, crime fiction, David Morrell, historical fiction, Victorian

For the past seven years, I’ve been a time traveller, writing a Victorian mystery trilogy about 1850’s London.  The three novels (Murder As a Fine Art, Inspector of the Dead, and Ruler of the Night) feature a controversial literary figure from the era, Thomas De Quincey, who was notorious for having written the first book about drug addiction, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821), and who praised mass murderers in his famous essay, ‘On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts’. Seven ye…

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Using Real Historical Characters in Fiction – S.G MacLean

Posted on: 14/11/2016 with tags: British History, civil war, cromwell, Damien Seeker, english civil war, English History, historical fiction, historical novel, history, oliver cromwell, S.G MacLean, The Black Friar, The Commonwealth, The Seeker

I am often asked about the extent to which I use real historical characters in my fiction. Because I write historical crime, I don’t feel I can use real characters as the victims or perpetrators of crimes that never actually happened, so I tend to just have them as subsidiary characters, and will occasionally throw suspicion on them. However, my most firm rule is not to show real historical characters in a bad light unless the portrayal is supported by historical record. I always bear in mind th…

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