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Hamilton: when historical truth is more interesting than musical fiction

Posted on: 11/10/2016 with tags: American Revolution, author blog, Elizabeth Cobbs, Hamilton, historical fiction, historical novel, American Revolution, Georgian

Elizabeth  Cobbs, author of The Hamilton Affair reveals that, whilst the hit musical Hamilton may tell a good tale, the marital histories of the real-life Schuyler sisters were even more intriguing. In the brilliant new musical Hamilton, Angelica Schuyler shocks viewers by admitting that her sexy brother-in-law’s fiery intellect—and tight military uniform—set her “e’vry part aflame.” But duty calls. When she and her sister Eliza meet the penniless West Indian upstart, Angelica shrewdly, if reluc…

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Karen Maitland introduces THE PLAGUE CHARMER

Posted on: 03/10/2016 with tags: historical fiction, historical novel, karen maitland, Medieval, medieval england, medieval history, plague, Medieval

My new novel is set in 1361 when the Black Death swept across England for the second time. When it first struck in 1348, the plague had seemed like the end of the world, but when it returned it just thirteen years later it was with a far more cruel and devastating twist. It is strange how ideas come together to create a novel. I was watching the news about Ebola when the reporter turned to the camera and asked a simple, but chilling, question – what would you do to save the lives of those you lo…

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On the trail of the Second Battle of Copenhagen

Posted on: 29/09/2016 with tags: historical fiction, Inferno, Julian Stockwin, European

My latest book in the Kydd Series is Inferno, published October 6. Mention of the Battle of Copenhagen brings to mind Horatio Nelson famously disobeying Sir Hyde Parker’s order to withdraw by holding a telescope to his blind eye to look at the signals from Parker. But there was a second battle of Copenhagen six years later that generates controversy to this day – did the British commit a War Crime by their bombardment of a neutral country and subsequent seizure of their entire Navy? The phrase ‘…

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Ed O’Loughlin on why the historical novel has more fun

Posted on: 09/09/2016 with tags: 18th century, Arctic Canada, Canada, Ed O'Loughlin, historical fiction, Minds of Winter, Modern history, Polar Exploration

Historical novels are a cheap form of tourism: the past is another country, they do things more exotically there. We don’t really know what it felt like to live in Victorian London, any more than we understand the lives of the poor of Peru or Cambodia, but we can drop in for a while and be charmed by the quaintness, titillated by the strife and the poverty, then return to the dull here and now. Historical novels are an escapist resort for people who are dismayed by the dreariness of contemporary…

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