Blog > Tag: the-unseeing

Clear filter

Writing Fiction Based on Fact by Anna Mazzola and Sarah Day

Posted on: 30/01/2017 with tags: Anna Mazzola, mussolini's island, sarah day, The Unseeing

Sarah Day and Anna Mazzola have both written historical novels based on real events. Anna’s debut novel, The Unseeing, is based on the life of a real woman convicted of aiding a murder in London in 1837. Sarah’s debut, Mussolini’s Island, is based on the arrest and imprisonment of a group of Sicilian gay men during the Fascist era. Here they give some pointers on how to go about writing a novel based on a true story. Know what you’re letting yourself in for. Anna: I think the first thing to say…

read more…

How the Victorians Changed Christmas by Anna Mazzola

Posted on: 24/11/2016 with tags: Anna Mazzola, christmas, Christmas Cards, Christmas Tree, Crackers, Father Christmas, The Unseeing, Victorians, Christmas, Victorian

Hate Christmas? Blame the Victorians. At the beginning of the 19th century, Christmas was barely celebrated. It wasn’t just Ebenezer Scrooge who begrudged his clerk the day off – many didn’t consider the 25th December to be a holiday. There were no crackers, no cards, no Santa, and no Christmas trees, at least not in England. By mid-century, however, Christmas was big business. Charles Dickens himself was partly to blame. A Christmas Carol, published in 1843, helped to popularise among the newly…

read more…

Anna Mazzola and Jane Housham talk THE UNSEEING and THE APPRENTICE OF SPLIT CROW LANE

Posted on: 07/11/2016 with tags: Anna Mazzola, author content, author interview, crime fiction, Jane Housham, The Apprentice of Split Crow Lane, The Unseeing, Victorian

Anna Mazzola: So we’ve both ended up writing about awful crimes from the nineteenth century. What’s your excuse? Jane Housham: I was researching my dad’s side of the family, who come from the North East, when I came across reports of an awful murder in Newcastle and Gateshead newspapers. At first I was just curious to know whether we might have a murderer in the family, but the more I looked into it, the more compelling it seemed to become, and aspects of the crime seemed to shake up things I th…

read more…