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Diving Into History – David Gibbins

Posted on: 03/01/2017 with tags: Archeology, Cornwall, David Gibbins, Diving, Jack Howard, Poldark, Testament, World History

DIVING INTO HISTORY Since writing my last blog for this site, my life and that of my fictional protagonist Jack Howard have become even more intertwined, and the inspiration for my stories has become even more closely drawn from my real-life experiences. In my novels – the latest, Testament, is the ninth in the series – Jack is an archaeologist working for the International Maritime University, a fictional institute set in his ancestral estate in Cornwall at the south-western tip of England. For…

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‘The Britain we live in today is the Britain of Attlee’s creation’ John Bew on his new book, CITIZEN CLEM

Posted on: 09/09/2016 with tags: biography, Citizen Clem, Clement Attlee, John Bew, Labour Party, non-fiction, Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, 20th Century, World History, WW1, WW2

The gallons of ink spilled on Winston Churchill – and the huge appetite for books about him – have created something of an imbalance in our understanding of twentieth-century Britain. Not only does Clement Attlee’s life deserve to have a rightful place alongside the Churchill legend. It is also more emblematic, and more representative, of Britain in his time. It is difficult to think of another individual through whom one can better tell the story of how Britain changed from the high imperialism…

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Top ten books on the East by Lucy Cruickshanks

Posted on: 12/02/2016 with tags: Book Recommendations, lucy cruickshanks, World History

1.     The Glass Palace by Amitav Ghosh takes the reader on an epic journey through more than a hundred years of Burmese history, chronicling the formation of a modern nation via the stories of three generations of intertwined families. It’s rich with cultural insights and colour, and with his ability to evoke a sense of time and place like few else, Ghosh deftly explores the complexities of colonialism, war, multiculturalism, dictatorship and the challenges to personal loyalties each brings. 2….

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Inspired by The Killing Fields

Posted on: 29/01/2016 with tags: Cambodia, Jacob's Colours, Lindsay Hawdon, The Killing Fields, 20th Century, Asian History, World History

Lindsay Hawdon has written this brilliant and moving article for us about her trip to Cambodia which helped inspire her novel Jakob’s Colours: ‘In October 2011 I set off with my two young boys on a trip around South East Asia for a year.  Though Jakob’s Colours is set during WWII, the following story very much affected a large part of the writing.  The events that occurred in Cambodia, only thirty six years ago, are very similar to what occurred during the holocaust.  Tragically they are still o…

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