Latest from the H for History blog

Martine Bailey on National Radio New Zealand!

Posted on: 03/07/2014 with tags: An Appetite for Violets, debut author, historical fiction, Martine Bailey, New Zealand, radio

This week, debut historical novelist Martine Bailey was featured on Radio New Zealand, talking about her wonderful, atmospheric and food-filled novel, AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS. You can listen to the full interview here. AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS is out now, available in trade paperback and as an eBook from Hodder & Stoughton. To find out more about Martine Bailey and AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS, you can visit Martine’s website, follow her on Twitter and Like her Facebook page.

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THESE IS MY WORDS, by Nancy Turner

Posted on: 05/06/2014 with tags: America, diary, historical fiction, Nancy Turner, reissue, Sarah Agnes Prine, These Is My Words

Today we are thrilled to be reissuing Nancy Turner’s marvellous debut novel, THESE IS MY WORDS.  Based on the life of the author’s great-grandmother, who single-handedly ran one of the largest ranches in the American West, THESE IS MY WORDS is the fictional diary of Sarah Agnes Prine, a woman of fire and spirit who forges a remarkable life for herself in a harsh, unforgivable frontier in the late 19th century.  Find out more about the novel on the Hodder & Stoughton website here,…

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Martine Bailey on Radio Gorgeous!

Posted on: 04/06/2014 with tags: An Appetite for Violets, author interview, interview, Martine Bailey, radio, Radio Gorgeous

AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS, Martine Bailey’s brilliant debut novel that has, in the words of Fay Weldon, launched a new genre – that of ‘culinary gothic’ – was featured on Radio Gorgeous this week. You can listen to Josephine speak to Martine about her novel, about food, food history, about Martine’s inspirations for the book and what she’s working on next, here. To find out more about Martine Bailey and AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS, visit her website here, Like her Faceboo…

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Rebecca Mascull interviewed by fellow Hodder author Martine Bailey

Posted on: 23/05/2014 with tags: An Appetite for Violets, author blog, author interview, debut novel, historical fiction, Martine Bailey, Rebecca Mascull, The Visitors, writing

In the second half of this week’s posts on our authors interviewing each other, here are Rebecca Mascull’s answers to Martine Bailey’s questions about her debut novel, THE VISITORS. 1. Tell me about your Great Great Aunt Adeliza. How did family history inspire you? When I was writing THE VISITORS, I decided to use hop farming as the profession of my main character’s father. I then discovered that there was a hop-farming connection in my family’s past. Some maternal relatives –…

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Martine Bailey interviewed by fellow Hodder author Rebecca Mascull

Posted on: 22/05/2014 with tags: An Appetite for Violets, author blog, author interview, debut novel, historical fiction, Martine Bailey, Rebecca Mascull, The Visitors

It’s wonderful when our authors love each other’s books as much as we do. That’s what happened to Martine Bailey and Rebecca Mascull, two debut historical novelists whose books we’re publishing this year. So they decided to interview each other over email about their books and their approach to writing.  Today we’re sharing with you Rebecca’s questions about Martine’s debut novel, AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS, which is published today, and tomorrow you can re…

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“Reading Historical Novels” – The third in a series of articles by Rebecca Mascull

Posted on: 21/05/2014 with tags: author blog, historical fiction, John Fowles, Reading Historical Novels, Rebecca Mascull, The French Lieutenant's Woman, The Visitors

Hello and here we are, at the third and final instalment of my trio of posts examining historical novels. All three choices were personal favourites, yet this last one – perhaps more than any other historical novel I have read – explores the nature of historical fiction and further, of the novel itself. THE FRENCH LIEUTENANT’S WOMAN by John Fowles An easterly is the most disagreeable wind in Lyme Bay – Lyme Bay being that largest bite from the underside of England’s outstretched south-west…

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“Reading Historical Novels” – The second in a series of articles by Rebecca Mascull

Posted on: 14/05/2014 with tags: Atonement, author blog, Booker Prize, historical fiction, historical novel, Ian McEwan, Reading Historical Novels, Rebecca Mascull, The Visitors

ATONEMENT by Ian McEwan Welcome to the second instalment in my three posts on reading the historical novel. This time we are looking at a beautiful novel from Ian McEwan (made into rather a beautiful film too), shortlisted for the 2001 Booker Prize. A novel of various viewpoints, it begins in the hot summer of 1934 in an English country house, with a child writer: The play – for which Briony had designed the posters, programmes and tickets, constructed the sales booth out of a folding screen tip…

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“Reading Historical Novels” – The first in a series of articles by Rebecca Mascull

Posted on: 30/04/2014 with tags: author blog, Booker Prize, historical novels, Margaret Atwood, reading, Rebecca Mascull, The Blind Assassin, The Visitors, writing

THE BLIND ASSASSIN by Margaret Atwood   Ten days after the war ended, my sister Laura drove a car off a bridge. The bridge was being repaired: she went right through the Danger sign. The car fell a hundred feet into the ravine, smashing through the treetops feathery with new leaves, then burst into flames and rolled down into the shallow creek at the bottom. Chunks of the bridge fell on top of it. Nothing much was left of her but charred smithereens.    I was informed of the accident by a police…

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Reading Historical Novels – a series of articles by Rebecca Mascull

Posted on: 28/04/2014 with tags: author blog, Booker Prize, historical fiction, Reading Historical Novels, Rebecca Mascull, The Visitors

Over the next three weeks, I’ll be looking at the openings of three of my favourite historical novels and trying to unearth the secrets they reveal about the books themselves. I’ll do my best not to include spoilers; if you haven’t read these books, I hope this will encourage you to do so. Instead, I’d like to look precisely at how it is these three brilliant novelists manage to grab the reader and convey the novel’s salient themes in just a few opening lines. First up is a Booker Prize-winning…

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