Blog > Genre: historical-fiction

Clear filter

Plymouth: Maritime Icon by Julian Stockwin

Posted on: 16/10/2019 Age of Sail, British History, English History

I have the great good fortune to live not far from Plymouth, Devon, that lovely county in southwest England. Given that I write Age of Sail fiction and have a long-held interest in all things to do with Neptune’s Realm, I probably couldn’t have chosen a better location! My latest book To The Eastern Seas opens with a crowd of onlookers standing on Plymouth Hoe, a large cliff-top south-facing grassy open space. They are peering out to sea awaiting the arrival of the ships returning from what was…

read more…

Who was Susanna Horenbout?

Posted on: 17/09/2019 with tags: alison weir, Anna of Kleve, Anne of Cleeves, henry viii, Six Tudor Queens, Susanna Horenbout, Tudor

Of about two dozen female artists working in the sixteenth century, Susanna Horenbout is one of the least known. In fact, no work can be attributed to her with confidence. Nevertheless, she is accounted as the first woman painter to have worked in England. She was actually Flemish and came from an artistic family of Ghent. Her father was the artist Gerard Horenbout (or Hornebolt), court painter to Margaret of Austria, Regent of the Netherlands, and her brother was the miniaturist Lucas Horenbout…

read more…

An Unknown Painting of the Young Anne of Cleves

Posted on: 25/07/2019 with tags: alison weir, Anna of CKleve, Anne of Cleves, portraiture, Tudor

Until last week, I would have stated firmly that there were no portraits of any of Henry VIII’s wives as young teenagers. But, wandering around the Basilika of St Lambertus in Dusseldorf (the former capital of Cleves, or Kleve), I was astonished to find this painting. It’s one of two triptychs of the Rosenkrantzbruderschaft – the Rosenkranz Brotherhood, or Confraternity of the Rosary, a religious society founded in 1468, which came to have a big community in Cologne. Painted by an unknown master…

read more…

Battling Bandoleros in the American Civil War

Posted on: 22/07/2019 with tags: Bandolero, Paul Fraser Collard, The Lost Outlaw, American Civil War

Bandoleros – it’s one of those beautifully evocative words that conjures up a hundred images all by itself. When I started planning for THE LOST OUTLAW – the eighth Jack Lark novel set in Mexico in 1863 – I knew I needed a powerful foe for Jack to face, and this time I did not have the luxury of a neatly defined enemy as I have had previously. However, it was not long before my research led me to the bandoleros who preyed on the hundreds of cotton trains making their way to Mexico from the south…

read more…