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Scandal in the Seymours by Alison Weir

Posted on: 09/01/2019 with tags: alison weir, henry viii, Jane Seymour, Six Tudor Queens, six wives, The Seymours, Tudor

It appears likely that there was some kind of scandal in Jane Seymour’s family before she came to court. By 1519, her brother Edward had married an heiress called Catherine Fillol. She bore two sons, John in 1527 and Edward in 1529, then seems to have retired to a convent. Mysteriously, her father, Sir William Fillol, in his will of 1527, directed that ‘for many diverse causes and considerations’, neither Catherine ‘nor her heirs of her body, nor Sir Edward Seymour her husband in any wise’ were…

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Read an extract from The Wicked Cometh by Laura Carlin

Posted on: 02/01/2019 with tags: debut novel, extract, 19th Century, Georgian, London

The Wicked Cometh is the beguiling historical mystery from debut author Laura Carlin, shortlisted for the Books Are My Bag Breakthrough Author Award. Read an extract here: The Wicked Cometh by Laura Carlin London, 1831 Do you think you know London? They say it’s the finest city in all of Europe. Perhaps you once stood and marvelled at the dome of St Paul’s? Or took a ride on a passenger craft and wove your way past the wherries and steamers as the great Thames carried you to the heart of the cit…

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Read an extract from Simon Scarrow’s THE BLOOD OF ROME

Posted on: 14/11/2018 with tags: extract, Macro and Cato, simon scarrow, The Blood of Rome, Roman

Ctesiphon, capital city of the Parthian Empire, March, AD 55 The setting sun lit up the broad stretch of the Tigris river, so that it gleamed like molten gold against the pale orange of the sky. The air was still and cool, and the last clouds of the thunderstorm that had drenched the city had passed to the south, leaving the faintest odour of iron in the gathering dusk. The servants of the royal palace were scurrying about their duties as they prepared the riverside pavilion for that evening’s m…

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History’s Forgotten Victims by Gill Paul

Posted on: 10/10/2018 with tags: Gill Paul, romanovs, the lost daughter, 20th Century

History is scattered with events in which the deaths of ‘ordinary people’ are overshadowed because someone famous was involved. In an extreme example, the first headlines in US newspapers after the Titanic sank in 1912 focused on the death of millionaire John Jacob Astor and only mentioned as an aside that 1,500 other people had perished. Jacqueline Kennedy was always careful to remember police officer J.D. Tippit, who was shot and killed by Lee Harvey Oswald when he pulled over his car 45 minut…

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