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Explore the archives of the Imperial War Museum

Posted on: 08/11/2019 20th Century, WW2

Take time out this November to rediscover four wartime classics from the archives of Imperial War Museums (IWM). Listen to the works of forgotten writers of the Second World War, read by a selection of great narrators including Jonathan Keeble and Matt Addis, and get a new insight into life on the front and at home. From the D-Day landings to jungle warfare, and a murder mystery set against the backdrop of the Blitz, these novels provide modern listeners with a fresh perspective on what it was l…

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The Personal Touch – Gill Thompson

Posted on: 17/10/2019 with tags: Gill Thompson, The Oceans Between Us, 20th Century, WW2

I’ve always preferred the kind of history that comes from people’s mouths rather than the pages of books, so when I first stumbled across the story of the child migrants from Britain to Australia, I was determined to track down people who’d been personally involved. I’d been horrified to discover that children, some as young as four, had been lured to a land ten thousand miles away, ostensibly to lead a better life but in reality to satisfy governmental agendas. Many were lied to, told they were…

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Plymouth: Maritime Icon by Julian Stockwin

Posted on: 16/10/2019 Age of Sail, British History, English History

I have the great good fortune to live not far from Plymouth, Devon, that lovely county in southwest England. Given that I write Age of Sail fiction and have a long-held interest in all things to do with Neptune’s Realm, I probably couldn’t have chosen a better location! My latest book To The Eastern Seas opens with a crowd of onlookers standing on Plymouth Hoe, a large cliff-top south-facing grassy open space. They are peering out to sea awaiting the arrival of the ships returning from what was…

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Who was Susanna Horenbout?

Posted on: 17/09/2019 with tags: alison weir, Anna of Kleve, Anne of Cleeves, henry viii, Six Tudor Queens, Susanna Horenbout, Tudor

Of about two dozen female artists working in the sixteenth century, Susanna Horenbout is one of the least known. In fact, no work can be attributed to her with confidence. Nevertheless, she is accounted as the first woman painter to have worked in England. She was actually Flemish and came from an artistic family of Ghent. Her father was the artist Gerard Horenbout (or Hornebolt), court painter to Margaret of Austria, Regent of the Netherlands, and her brother was the miniaturist Lucas Horenbout…

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