Blog > Period: early-modern

The Early Modern period covers the Reformation and the Renaissance, the Tudors and the Stuarts and on to the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century.

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Living in the Past by Robyn Young

Posted on: 06/08/2018 with tags: author blog, court of wolves, historical fiction, historical novel, new world rising, robyn young, European, Renaissance, World History

It’s a summer’s morning and I’m standing in a field with a gun in my hands – a flintlock musket from the English Civil War, long and heavy, the stock hunched into my shoulder, barrel aimed down the field. I struggle to pull back the hammer, needing two fingers to do so.  It’s stiff and I’m nervous.  The pan is loaded with gunpowder and the flint is now poised above it.  I pull the trigger.  The flint snaps down, striking the powder to life with a flash, sending a rush of fire and force down the…

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Gunpowder, treason and plot by Tracy Borman

Posted on: 15/06/2018 with tags: English History, gunpowder plot, historical fiction, historical novel, james i, tower of london, tracy borman, witchcraft, Stuart, Tudor

Tracy Borman reveals the long process behind her move into historical fiction… The publication of my debut novel, The King’s Witch, this June marks the realisation of a long-cherished ambition.  I read historical fiction all the time and have often dreamed of penning a novel myself, then a chance meeting at Harrogate History Festival a few years ago made that a reality.  Hodder’s Nick Sayers, one of the best fiction editors in the business, happened to be there with another author and we got c…

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Waiting for D-Day – Marianne Kavanagh on the week before Operation Neptune

Posted on: 18/05/2017 with tags: English History, historical fiction, world war II, WW2

Six days form the structure of SHOULD YOU ASK ME – six days in May 1944 just before D-Day. This is how long it takes 86-year-old Mary to tell her story to William, a young policeman recently invalided out of the army, and for William in turn to confess. With wartime resources stretched to the limit, Mary’s tale of two long-dead bodies is not considered high priority. Only William has the time to listen. Meanwhile, both inside and outside the small rural police station in Dorset, it feels as if v…

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How Did Henry VIII become a monster? by Alison Weir

Posted on: 23/01/2017 with tags: alison weir, anne boleyn, author blog, henry viii, historical fiction, historical novel, katherine of aragon, Six Tudor Queens, six wives, tudors, Tudor

Alison Weir, author of KATHERINE OF ARAGON: THE TRUE QUEEN, the first in her Six Tudor Queens series looks at a common misconception about Henry VIII…   I would like to correct a misconception about Henry VIII. It is often claimed that he suddenly changed character, for the worse, in 1536, after a blow to the head sustained in a fall. On 24 January that year, during a joust at Greenwich, he was indeed thrown from his horse. Rodolfo Pio, the Papal Nuncio in Paris, reported on 12 February t…

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