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Author David Morrell on escaping to Victorian London

Posted on: 17/11/2016 with tags: author blog, crime fiction, David Morrell, historical fiction, Victorian

For the past seven years, I’ve been a time traveller, writing a Victorian mystery trilogy about 1850’s London.  The three novels (Murder As a Fine Art, Inspector of the Dead, and Ruler of the Night) feature a controversial literary figure from the era, Thomas De Quincey, who was notorious for having written the first book about drug addiction, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821), and who praised mass murderers in his famous essay, ‘On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts’. Seven ye…

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Snooping in the name of History – Jane Housham

Posted on: 02/11/2016 with tags: author blog, English History, historical crime, historical novel, history, Jane Housham, The Apprentice of Split Crow Lane, Victorian, 20th Century, Victorian

For me no trip to Brighton is complete without a poke around Snoopers’ Paradise, the rambling antique emporium in the North Laine. I was rifling through a box of old photographs there when I noticed that some seemed to have come from the same album as they were numbered on the back in a distinctive hand. I bought all of them that I could find. The photos were just small, fairly undistinguished images, some quite blurry, but whoever they had belonged to had a wonderfully organised mind. Not only…

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Lady Godiva by David Churchill

Posted on: 01/11/2016 with tags: author blog, david churchill, English History, historical fiction, Lady Godiva, william the conqueror, Medieval

One of the delights of writing the Leopards of Normandy series has been the entirely unexpected discoveries that I’ve bumped into along the way. I had no idea, for example, that the Lady Godiva, who, famously, though perhaps not factually, rode naked through the streets of Coventry, was actually a Saxon noblewoman called Godgifu, whose life overlapped with that of William the Conqueror. I was equally unaware that the Coventry through which she allegedly rode was not the bustling medieval cathedr…

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The Norman Conquest in Numbers by James Aitcheson

Posted on: 14/10/2016 with tags: author blog, English History, historical crime, historical fiction, Medieval, medieval england, medieval history, The Norman Conquest, Asian History, Medieval, Norman

This month marks the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings: the beginning of the Norman Conquest of England, and perhaps the single most famous event in all of British history. The battle, which took place on 14 October 1066, saw King Harold II killed and his English army defeated by Duke William of Normandy, who shortly afterwards was himself crowned king, ushering in a new French-speaking ruling dynasty and altering England’s destiny forever. 7,000 Estimated size both of Harold’s army an…

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