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How to research an historical novel – by Rebecca Mascull

Posted on: 20/02/2014 with tags: debut author, debut novel, historical fiction, historical novel, historical research, Kent, Rebecca Mascull, The Visitors, writing

THE VISITORS is not the first historical novel I have written. I practised the craft by spending three years writing a World War II drama set in both London and Poland, which sadly did not find a publisher (yet who knows, perhaps one day I might resurrect it …). That was the first piece of historical fiction I had attempted and, my word, what a huge learning curve it was. I learnt by doing, by trial and error, accident and inspiration. I found out what worked for me, what took too long an…

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Authors Rebecca Mascull and Katherine Clements interview each other!

Posted on: 08/11/2013 with tags: author interview, authors, debut novel, eighteenth century, english civil war, English History, fact, fiction, historical events, historical fiction, historical record, historical research, history, inspiration, katherine clements, literary fiction, real characters, Rebecca Mascull, seventeenth century, the crimson ribbon, The Visitors, writing

Rebecca Mascull Katherine Clements Why do you write historical fiction? RM: As with many debut novelists, my first published novel, THE VISITORS, is not in fact my first completed novel. I wrote three novels before this and only one of these was an historical novel. My third novel was set during World War II, in both London and Poland. At the time, it seemed ridiculously ambitious and I was certain I wouldn’t be able to do it. I researched that novel full-time for over a year, read over a…

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Authors Rebecca Mascull and Kerry Drewery interview each other

Posted on: 19/09/2013 with tags: authors, fact, fiction, historical fiction, historical research, inspiration, interview, Rebecca Mascull, The Visitors, writing

Rebecca Mascull Kerry Drewery What are your research methods? KD: I tend to start off quite wide, just to get a feel for the place; reading novels set there, watching documentaries, etc, and as I get to know where the story is going the research will become more specific to do with time/place/event etc. With A Brighter Fear, I wanted to get a range of opinions on what was happening, so I read accounts by soldiers, people living there, journalists. I also created a ‘picture board’, with photos of…

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