Blog > Tag: history

Clear filter

How Queen Victoria invented the Royal Wedding

Posted on: 20/12/2018 with tags: history, Lucy Worsley, Queen Victoria, 19th Century, Royal Family, Royal Wedding, Victorian

Victoria and Albert’s famous marriage began with a spectacular royal wedding, just like Prince Harry and Meghan Markle earlier this year. We enjoyed the familiar carriage ride along the streets, the big white dress, the scores of bridesmaids, and the general air of fairytale romance. But the royal wedding as it is today, and in fact many of the wedding traditions we all enjoy on our own big day, wouldn’t have existed without Queen Victoria. Here are just a few of the ways Victoria shaped modern…

read more…

A must-have for anyone interested in cartography: Theatre of the World

Posted on: 11/12/2018 with tags: christmas, history

Theatre of the World reignites our curiosity with the world both ancient and modern. It is beautifully illustrated and rich in detail. Before you could just scroll Google Maps, maps were being constructed from the ideas and questions of pioneering individuals. From visionary geographers to heroic explorers, from the mysterious symbols of the Stone Age to the familiar navigation of Google Earth, Thomas Reinertsen Berg examines the fascinating concepts of science and worldview, of art and technolo…

read more…

CONSTANTINOPLE 1453: THE GREATEST SIEGE IN HISTORY – JAMES HENEAGE

Posted on: 18/08/2017 with tags: author blog, By Blood Divided, Constantinople, English History, historical fiction, history, James Heneage

CONSTANTINOPLE 1453: THE GREATEST SIEGE IN HISTORY – JAMES HENEAGE There have been longer sieges, there have been ones involving bigger armies and worse slaughter, but none have been so dramatic and consequential as the fall of Constantinople in 1453. The siege didn’t last very long- just 53 days- and the armies numbered perhaps 50,000 Turks and 7,000 defenders. But it while it lasted, the whole world held its breath. And when it was over, the world had changed forever. Why was it so important?…

read more…

Historical fiction, ancestry and artefacts

Posted on: 07/07/2017 with tags: ancestry, archaeology, artefacts, David Gibbins, history, Testament

My most recent novel, TESTAMENT, contains five chapters of historical fiction – a prologue set at the time of the Phoenicians in the 6th century BC, two chapters set during the British Abyssinia campaign of 1868-9 and another two chapters at Bletchley Park in 1943. That emphasis on historical fiction continues the pattern of my eight previous Jack Howard novels, all present-day thrillers but with settings ranging from the earliest seafaring in the Neolithic to the Roman destruction of Jerusalem…

read more…