Blog > Tag: reviews

Clear filter

Jeska Lyons reviews The Unseeing by Anna Mozzola

Posted on: 09/09/2016 with tags: crime fiction, debut novel, historical crime, historical fiction, history, Reviews, Victorian, Victorian England

What struck me the most when reading this book was the incredible sense of time and place Mazzola creates, and how vividly she paints a picture of grim 1830s London. We meet Sarah Gale, the epitome of a fallen woman, as she is sentenced to hang for assisting her lover James Greenacre in the murder of the seemingly innocent Hannah Brown. From the first page you are transported into poor Sarah Gales’ bleak world, and you don’t escape from her reality until you close the book completely. The atmosp…

read more…

A review of The Lion of Mistra

Posted on: 13/04/2016 with tags: Byzantine empire, James Heneage, Reviews, The Lion of Mistra, Roman

I had not read one of James Heneage’s Rise of Empires novels before and despite having quite a good (or so I thought) knowledge of history, the Byzantine empire was a definite gap, so I wasn’t really sure what to expect when I picked up the third in the series The Lion of Mistra. What a fantastic surprise it turned out to be! The novel follows the exploits of Luke Magoris who must trade, battle and hunt for treasure in his desperate attempt to save Mistra, the last great outpost of Imperial Rome…

read more…

Best historical fiction out in April

Posted on: 31/03/2016 with tags: new books, Reviews

The Lion of Mistra James Heneage Rome never fell. It became Byzantium … As Ottoman forces invade, one man must defend his country and face his own personal destiny. A rich tale of clashing empires and trade wars, lost treasure and tempestuous love in an age when the fate of the world hung on the survival of Byzantium. It was an era that made the modern world and a place that was then, as now, the hinge between east and west. Luke Magoris, descendant of princes of England, is a man with a rare ta…

read more…

Review of The Butcher’s Hook by Janet Ellis

Posted on: 18/02/2016 with tags: 18th century, janet ellis, Reviews, the butcher's hook, Georgian

From the start Janet Ellis’ The Butcher’s Hook draws you in to the sights, sounds, smells and textures of Georgian London – be they pleasant or unpleasant. It is an incredibly sensory book – as you walk the streets of London with Anne, to Leveners, to see Fub, the butcher’s apprentice you feel as if you are with her. And Anne is an amazing central character. Determined to say the least – and prioritising her own happiness and future, whatever the cost. Even as it says in the blurb, it means she…

read more…