Blog > Tag: six-wives

Clear filter

Alison Weir introduces Anna of Kleve

Posted on: 10/07/2018 with tags: alison weir, Anna of Kleve, Anne of Cleves, henry viii, Six Tudor Queens, six wives, Tudor

Most people think of Anna of Cleves – or Anna of Kleve, as she should be known – as the luckiest of Henry VIII’s wives. Having re-researched her story in depth for Anna of Kleve: Queens of Secrets, the fourth novel in my Six Tudor Queens series, I am not so sure that is true. Anna should have had it all: a crown, a great marriage to a powerful king, wealth, influence and popularity. But it was all snatched from her, for reasons that are still not fully clear. When, within a month of Jane Seymour…

read more…

Henry VIII’s Marriage to Jane Seymour by Alison Weir

Posted on: 16/05/2018 with tags: alison weir, anne boleyn, henry viii, Jane Seymour, Royal Weddings, Six Tudor Queens, six wives, Tudor

Just before dawn on 25 January 1533, a small group of people gathered in the King’s private chapel in Whitehall Palace for Henry VIII’s secret wedding to Anne. ‘It has been reported throughout a great part of the realm that I married her, which was plainly false,’ Cranmer protested, ‘for I myself knew not thereof a fortnight after it was done.’ The officiating priest was either Dr Rowland Lee, one of the royal chaplains, or George Brown, Prior of the Austin Friars in London. It is more likely to…

read more…

Ladies in Waiting – Alison Weir

Posted on: 01/05/2018 with tags: alison weir, anne boleyn, henry viii, Jane Seymour, katherine of aragon, Ladies in Waiting, Six Queens, six wives, Tudor

The wives of Henry VIII were served by a hierarchy of female attendants, mostly of noble and gentle birth. These were the women who resided with her in her private apartments – a chaste female enclave within the King’s ‘house of magnificence’. The Queen’s lodgings normally consisted of a presence chamber (throne room) for audiences and entertaining; and a privy chamber, which, like the King’s, might comprise bedchambers, closets, a privy, a privy wardrobe and sometimes a privy kitchen, where the…

read more…

How Did Henry VIII become a monster? by Alison Weir

Posted on: 23/01/2017 with tags: alison weir, anne boleyn, author blog, henry viii, historical fiction, historical novel, katherine of aragon, Six Tudor Queens, six wives, tudors, Tudor

Alison Weir, author of KATHERINE OF ARAGON: THE TRUE QUEEN, the first in her Six Tudor Queens series looks at a common misconception about Henry VIII…   I would like to correct a misconception about Henry VIII. It is often claimed that he suddenly changed character, for the worse, in 1536, after a blow to the head sustained in a fall. On 24 January that year, during a joust at Greenwich, he was indeed thrown from his horse. Rodolfo Pio, the Papal Nuncio in Paris, reported on 12 February t…

read more…