Latest from the H for History blog

H for History Rooftop Bookclub – 19th March 2019

Posted on: 14/02/2019 with tags: alison weir, Anna Mazzola, hb lyle, robyn young, Rooftop Bookclub, SD Skyes, simon scarrow, Sonia Velton, tracy borman

Find out more about the authors featuring in our H for History Rooftop Bookclub on 19th March, sponsored by BBC History. Find out more about the event. Tickets available here. This sensational evening features eight of the best historical fiction authors. Women in History: Hosted by Anna Mazzola: Anna Mazzola’s first novel, THE UNSEEING, was published to critical acclaim in 2016. She is a criminal justice solicitor and lives in South East London with her husband and two children. Longlisted for…

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Extract: A Capitol Death by Lindsey Davis

Posted on: 08/02/2019 with tags: extract, Roman

Private Invesitgator Flavia Albia is back in Lindsey Davis’s next gripping and witty mystery set in Ancient Rome, A Capitol Death. Publishing in April 2019, we are delighted to share a sneak-peek extract of the first chapter: A Capitol Death by Lindsey Davis Rome: the Capitoline Hill, November ad 89 Chapter 1 Domitian was back. I state this in completely neutral language. Your slave must read it out to you with no hint of judgement. Even if  he or she is a highly educated, clever specimen, who c…

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An Interview with Betty Foster – The background to Jennifer Robson’s THE GOWN

Posted on: 07/02/2019 with tags: Jennifer Robson, Queen Elizabeth II, The Gown, 20th Century

The Gown is an enthralling historical novel about one of the most famous wedding dresses of the twentieth century – Queen Elizabeth’s wedding gown – and the fascinating women who made it. In February 2017 Jennifer Robson, the author  had the good fortune to interview Mrs. Betty Foster, one of the four seamstresses who helped to create Princess Elizabeth’s wedding gown in 1947. “The following passages are only a brief sample of our hours-long conversation, which took place at her home in the sout…

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Chinese New Year: A Feast for the Gods and Family by Yangsze Choo

Posted on: 05/02/2019

Lunar new year is upon us, and I’m almost ready. That is, if one can prepare for several days of non-stop eating and visiting relatives. This year’s lunar new year falls on February 5, which is uncomfortably close to the excesses of Christmas and New Year’s, when I told myself sternly that I must stop drinking bubble tea and do more push ups. “You could just do things in moderation,” my husband pointed out mildly. Clearly he had no idea of the true crazy scope of this festival. The lunar new yea…

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H for History welcomes… Jodi Taylor

Posted on: 05/02/2019 with tags: Jodi Taylor, St Mary's Chronicles

Hi, my name is Jodi Taylor and I’m an author. I’m also a chocoholic, easily confused, clumsy and with the attention span of a – what was I saying? People ask me how and why I started to write. The short answer is – I was bored. After long, long years in local government, I retired to Turkey – as you do. Typically, after many years hard work for a pitifully small remuneration, no sooner could I legitimately sit in the sun with a glass of something in one hand, and a paperback in the other, than I…

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A River in the Trees by Jacqueline O’Mahony

Posted on: 10/01/2019

This January marks the centenary of the outbreak of the Irish War of Independence. One hundred years ago, this month, the Irish formed a government, and declared independence from British rule. That declaration led to war. My book, A River In The Trees, is set in 1919 and 2019. It’s the story of two women, a hundred years apart, but bound together by a secret. Hannah, in 1919, becomes caught up in the struggle for a free Ireland. She’s trying to forge an identity for herself, to break free from…

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The World of Blackberry and Wild Rose by Sonia Velton

Posted on: 09/01/2019

History buffs, get excited. Sonia Velton, author of Blackberry and Wild Rose, is about to take you on a tour of Eighteenth Century Spitalfields and the Huguenot silk weavers who lived there… Take a walk through the streets of Spitalfields and you can still see and feel the presence of the Huguenot silk weavers.  They are there in the wooden spools hanging from the weavers’ houses, they are there in the shadows of the eighteenth century sundial on what was once La Neuve Église, and they echo th…

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Scandal in the Seymours by Alison Weir

Posted on: 09/01/2019 with tags: alison weir, henry viii, Jane Seymour, Six Tudor Queens, six wives, The Seymours, Tudor

It appears likely that there was some kind of scandal in Jane Seymour’s family before she came to court. By 1519, her brother Edward had married an heiress called Catherine Fillol. She bore two sons, John in 1527 and Edward in 1529, then seems to have retired to a convent. Mysteriously, her father, Sir William Fillol, in his will of 1527, directed that ‘for many diverse causes and considerations’, neither Catherine ‘nor her heirs of her body, nor Sir Edward Seymour her husband in any wise’ were…

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Read an extract from The Wicked Cometh by Laura Carlin

Posted on: 02/01/2019 with tags: debut novel, extract, 19th Century, Georgian, London

The Wicked Cometh is the beguiling historical mystery from debut author Laura Carlin, shortlisted for the Books Are My Bag Breakthrough Author Award. Read an extract here: The Wicked Cometh by Laura Carlin London, 1831 Do you think you know London? They say it’s the finest city in all of Europe. Perhaps you once stood and marvelled at the dome of St Paul’s? Or took a ride on a passenger craft and wove your way past the wherries and steamers as the great Thames carried you to the heart of the cit…

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Decorated SOE Major betrayed by political infighting by Damien Lewis

Posted on: 27/12/2018

Caused his untimely death and the defeat of one of Italy’s most feared band of partisans. In a quiet yet picturesque commonwealth war cemetery in Genoa, Italy, lies a man who lived an adventurer’s life. His headstone portrays nothing of his exploits, the name carved on it isn’t the one he was known by during the war, and the regimental badge thereon obscures the elite ‘Special Duty’ unit to which he really belonged. The dedication at the bottom of the headstone – “In proud and affectionate memor…

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